3 Strategies on how to stick to your New Year’s Resolutions

By Fatima Kane 

Here are our strategies on how to actually keep your 2019 New Year’s Resolutions – and not just until January 2nd!

Plan it out 

It’s great to aim high with your goals, but you want have an idea how to get there. To make your resolution seem less daunting, plan it out on paper in smaller, more specific steps that will allow you to accomplish your goal. Giving yourself deadlines and time limits to complete certain steps can help you stay on track and keep moving forward. You can easily set up your plans on a calendar, agenda, journal and with reminders to make sure that 2019 is the year for you!

Remind yourself. Constantly. 

All the hopes for your resolutions go out the window, unless you constantly remind yourself of your goals and make them a daily important priority. Setting up to-do lists, notes, or reminders for yourself, allows you to keep your resolutions at the forefront of your mind. Positive reminders of your plans will go a long way in helping to keep you motivated. 

Keep track of your progress!

0164c9816ef849786cb2a9f464044825

Recording significant (or even seemingly insignificant steps) you’ll take during the year is the perfect way to keep to being motivated, committed, and striving for your target! Studies have shown that “monitoring” your steps leads to higher success in sticking with your resolutions. Keeping track of your progress allows you to remind yourself of how far you have gone and how close you are to the finish line! And don’t stress about having a couple “cheat-days.” Perfection can’t be expected, and any progress is a reason to be proud! Just don’t let these days distract you from your goals. 

Good luck with your 2019 New Year’s Resolutions! 

 

Image Source: “Bullet Journal Monthly Habit Tracker, Flower Drawing. | @Littleolivebujo | Bullet Journal Ideas | Pinterest | Bullet Journal, Journal and Bullet.” Pinterest, http://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/408912841160773537/.

Managing the PSAT Stress

By Caroline Morvan

Every October in classrooms of schools around the world, high school juniors and sophomores gather to take the PSAT.

Short for “preliminary SAT,” the PSAT helps students, parents, and guidance counselors get a sense of the kind of work students need to do to prepare for the SAT or ACT, and can also help with initial expectations for a student’s college prospects. Particularly strong scores can lead to recognition by the National Merit Scholarship program, which in turn can lead to more money or other positive interest for colleges.

Therefore, it’s not surprising that this test usually generates a sense of anxiety among students who are going to take it. This October 24th, the day of the test, was no different: EAB sophomores and juniors who were about to enter the testing room were a bit anxious. “Considering the fact that I’m American I was kinda nervous scholarship-wise,” said sophomore student Isabelle Bautista.

At the end of the day, the PSAT is not something students should be stressing out about. This practice test can even help reduce the juniors’ and sophomores’ stress, since it gives a sense of what it’s going to be like in the final run. “When I got too nervous I reminded myself not to be too stressed about it, for it’s not the official SAT but a practice one and it would give me a good sense for what the real [one] would be like,” said Isabelle.

In terms of what we have discussed about success this past week, it seems that the 2018 PSAT was successful, for students walked out of the test a lot more confident about taking the SATs in their senior year. Junior Valentina Foresti said that although she did not study for the test she felt it was quite easy, especially the math section.

And in the words of the sophomore Fatima Kane:

Students shouldn’t worry too much about it because they will have plenty of time to improve their SAT score before colleges see. 

 

Image Source: 

Vives, Ruben. “Taking the SAT Is Hard Enough. Then Students Learned the Test’s Answers May Have Been Leaked Online.” Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times, 27 Aug. 2018, http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-sat-exam-leaked-20180827-story.html.

Worried about the PSAT? We’ve got you covered.

By Bruna Abrão

The PSAT is here, and for the ones who are taking it for the first time (myself included), my first tip is don’t freak out. In the end of the day, it is just a practice. The whole intent of the PSAT is for you to figure out where you’re at so that you can set up your game plan and be ready when you have to take the SAT or the ACT. The only thing it really counts for is the National Merit Scholarship Qualification and the National Merit Commended Qualification, which you can be qualified to if you score on the top 2% of students in the United States. However, they are both only available to American citizens. Anyway, here are some tips, tricks and strategies to help you do well on  the PSAT.

Familiarize yourself with the test

The first thing you should do is to take a look at the practice tests. You can find them online, or by looking at the booklet which was given to you a few weeks ago (Mr. Hornbuckle probably has spare ones). If you don’t have three spare hours time to take the entire practice test beforehand, you should at least look over the directions, which are basically the same for every test.

Another thing you should probably figure out before taking the test is how to grid the math problems. If you don’t know how to do that, here’s how. First you write your answer in the boxes at the top of the columns. This is not required, but it might help you. Then, color the circles with your answer. You cannot color more than one circle in each column. Dots and slashes have their own column, and no question have negative answers. If a problem has more than one answer, grid only one of them. Mixed numbers have to be written as either decimals or as fractions. Otherwise, 3½ could be interpreted as 31/2. Lastly, if you have a decimal answer with more digits than the grid can accommodate, you can round it, but you must fill the entire grid.

Screen Shot 2018-03-23 at 5.01.24 PM.png

Materials you will need

  1. A Number 2 pencil and an eraser. Mechanical pencils are not allowed.
  2. An approved graphing calculator (Ti-84 works).
  3. A watch that doesn’t beep so you can easily time yourself. There will also be a visible clock in the testing room, so this isn’t an absolute requirement.
  4. A water bottle (It’s very dry this time of the year, and the test is very long. Stay hydrated).

Pace yourself

Don’t get too hung up on one or two questions. Otherwise you might spend ten or even fifteen minutes on the same question and then you won’t have time to finish the test. It’s not a very good gauge of what you are capable of if you spend all your time on this question that is only worth one point, and you didn’t even get to the rest of the questions that you could have very well gotten right. So make sure you don’t lose track of time. If you’re having trouble with one question, try putting a giant star right next to it and come back to it after you finish the rest.

Guessing

To make this very clear, I don’t recommend guessing, but if for some reason you didn’t pace yourself or you couldn’t finish in time, make sure you fill in every bubble on that test. There’s no penalty for guessing, and this way you will get at least a probabilistic chance of getting those right.

So these are the tips that I have for you today. And, again, don’t freak out. It’s all good. Good luck!