Welcome New Bullseye Leadership!

Dear EAB Community, 

It is my pleasure to officially announce the turnover in Bullseye leadership for 2020! 

Cecilia Nakao (‘21) – Co-Editor

Lucy Landry (‘21) – Co-Editor

Kristine Bakker (‘21) – Communications Director

Fernanda Ferreira (‘21) – Creative Director

The new team is a strong, diverse group of people that we are confident will take Bullseye in a new, innovative direction. A new change this year, is that we decided to have two Co-Editors, as we feel that being Editor is a large responsibility, and that the newspaper should have as much support as possible. We believe that, although Cecilia and Lucy are very different, they both have valuable characteristics that will balance each other out and compliment each other nicely.

We have high hopes for the club’s future and what the new leadership will accomplish. We also want to thank you – the readers – for your constant support of our newspaper, and hope you will continue to read and enjoy our material in the coming years. 

Here’s to a great new year, and the successful continuation of one of EAB’s oldest organizations!

– Emma Holm-Olsen. Bullseye Editor, 2019.

Coronavirus: Prevention, symptoms, and treatment

By Lucy Landry

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Above: Colorized illustration of COVID-19.

Information and updates on COVID-19, commonly known as the Coronavirus, have appeared unflaggingly on every news source since the very first headlines of the rapid spread within China hit the stands. With frightening new data showing the spread of the disease, people around the globe have begun to panic. However, there are effective ways in which to slow the spread of the disease and to stay healthy and free from COVID-19.

Prevention

Coronavirus is spread from contact with a diseased person. Coughing or sneezing from someone affected by COVID-19 can cause droplets containing the disease to fall on the “mouths or noses” of others nearby and can “possibly be inhaled into the lungs” (“Transmission”). The virus can also be contracted by coming into contact with objects which have been infected. The disease is spread “easily and sustainably,” and thus precautions must be taken to prevent getting it (“Transmission”). 

Although vaccines to protect against the contraction of COVID-19 are not yet available, there are lots of other ways in which one can prevent themselves from getting the disease. One should “avoid close contact” with infected people and refrain from touching one’s “eyes, nose, and mouth” (“Prevention, Treatment”). One should also wash their hands “for at least twenty seconds” (fun tip: sing “Happy Birthday” twice) after using the restroom, prior to eating, and “after sneezing, coughing,” or using a tissue to blow one’s nose (“Prevention, Treatment”). Staying home when one is feeling sick and regularly disinfecting often-touched objects are also great ways to prevent the disease’s spread (“Prevention, Treatment”).

Symptoms

Coronavirus symptoms are similar to those of a cold or a case of the flu (“Symptoms”). Reported COVID-19 cases claim “mild to severe respiratory illness” in infected people (“Symptoms”). Symptoms that signal that one might have the Coronavirus are: “fever,” “cough,” and “shortness of breath” (“Symptoms”). Other symptoms might include vomiting, diarrhea, chills, itchy and red eyes, feelings of fatigue, discomfort, weakness or muscle aches, and nasal congestion. People only show these symptoms within two to fourteen days of contracting it (“Symptoms”). COVID-19 is a fast-spreading illness, so it is important to catch it early and seek medical attention.

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Above: Areas where COVID-19 cases have been reported and confirmed as of March 3rd, 2020 (“Situation Reports”). 

One should contact a medical professional right away if one shows any of the above symptoms and has traveled to any of the following countries in the last two weeks: China, Iran, South Korea, Italy, Japan (“Information for Travelers”).

Treatments

There is not much of a treatment for the Coronavirus. Those who test positive for it are placed in an area where they cannot spread the disease to others. In acute cases of COVID-19, “support” to “vital organ functions” are provided in order to help the body overcome the disease (“Prevention, Treatment”). It is imperative that infected people or people who suspect they have been infected seek immediate medical attention in order to beat COVID-19. 

Reported Cases and Death Rate

Although the disease is highly contagious and its spread quite scary and quite real, the current (reported) death rate for COVID-19 is low. 

Most vulnerable to suffering a more severe case of COVID-19 are elderly people and those with “pre-existing medical conditions” like “asthma, diabetes,” and “heart disease” (“COVID-19 Myth Busters”). Most COVID-19 related deaths come from these demographics, but, even so, as of the publishing of this article, data from WHO shows a death rate of little over two percent (“Situation Reports”). Deaths resulting from COVID-19 are actually dropping in China, where the disease originated (Aizenman).

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Above: Graph from NPR showing the drop in COVID-19 related deaths in China (Aizenman).

COVID-19 has not been shown to be a disease where a majority of the infected are perishing because of it.

Actions at EAB

EAB has asked families to keep their children at home if they are sick or show any symptoms of COVID-19. Those families which have recently traveled to China (including Hong Kong), Japan, South Korea, Iran, and Italy are asked to contact the school to discuss whether or not the student should stay at home for the recommended fourteen-day waiting period. EAB’s leadership team has also asked that students and faculty sneeze and cough into their elbows, blow their nose in a tissue, promptly throw out used tissues in a waste bin, and remain at home if they are feeling sick. EAB has increased the number of tissues and alcohol-based hand sanitizers around the school and in classrooms.

Works Cited

Aizenman, Nurith. “Why The Death Rate From Coronavirus Is Plunging In China.” NPR, NPR, 3 Mar. 2020, http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/03/03/809904660/why-the-death-rate-from-coronavirus-is-plunging-in-china.

“COVID-19 Information for Travelers.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 29 Feb. 2020, http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/index.html.

“COVID-19 Myth Busters.” World Health Organization, World Health Organization, http://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/myth-busters.

“Novel Coronavirus (2019-NCoV) Situation Reports.” World Health Organization, World Health Organization, http://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports.

“Prevention, Treatment of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 Feb. 2020, http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html.

“Symptoms of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 29 Feb. 2020, http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/symptoms.html.

“Transmission of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 28 Feb. 2020, http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html.

Upcoming Club at EAB: Medlife

By Lucy Landry

IMG_5746A new and promising club has begun at the Americna School of Brasilia: Medlife. The Medlife chapter at EAB is fighting for healthcare and education access to disadvantaged communities throughout South America. Medlife, short for Medicine Education Development for Low Income Families Everywhere, envisions a world without poverty from local to international outreach.

Representatives on EAB’s Medlife Executive Board said that through this organization, students are “raising awareness about mental and physical health topics, promoting local primary care, and participating in projects to aid local communities and international communities.” They also point out that this club informs students about global issues concerning healthcare that are often overlooked by larger society.

EAB’s chapter of Medlife is the first one to be established in Brazil and is headed by founder and president Carolina Santana Morvan. The club will be organizing both a service-learning trip and a project concerning dentistry access this school year and will be traveling to Peru to volunteer at a mobile clinic to assist poorer communities.

“We listen, we give, and we care”

“We listen, we give, and we care” is the motto of this organization, and is extremely evident in the amount of care they are putting into the developing world.

Students who wish to be part of Medlife and its mission to create a world without poverty can join the group’s Monday meetings in room US27 during the second half of lunch. The chapter encourages students to aid them in their quest to provide Medicine Education Development for Low Income Families Everywhere and forge a world where medical aid is available to all.

 

Club Spotlight: EAB Goes Green!

By Emma Holm-Olsen

 

I’m sure you’ve all heard about EAB Goes Green (EGG) at some point or another, but do any of you actually know what EGG has been doing, and plans to do? My guess is no, or at least not entirely. In any case, as a new member of EGG, I wanted to use Bullseye’s platform to educate our community about all of the fascinating and important initiatives the club is doing. Recently, the club and some other students and staff that were interested, took a trip to Sitio Geranium, a sustainable farm dedicated to saving energy and resources, and developing new techniques and inventions to ensure future sustainability and environmental conservation.

(Photos below courtesy of EAB Goes Green)

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The farm advertises itself as an “open-air classroom with the purpose of environmental education” (Sitio Geranium). The visit was not only fun, but it was really inspiring to see how a small farm in the outskirts of Brasilia is doing so much to preserve the resources we have, as well as educating students and other visitors about how we as regular citizens can incorporate some of the same practices into our daily lives. From organic composting to green houses, the farm essentially had around 95% sustainability across the facility, an incredible feat for a institution, and a business no less, in this day and age. The club is actively trying to incorporate some of these ideas into initiatives at our school, including possibly an annual Environmental Day at EAB and even our very own composting area. Now you’re probably thinking, “Ok this is good and all, but how much of an effect are all of these things going to have on the students’ actions and opinions about the environment?” And you’re completely right. Which is why the club has also been advocating to change the very things our students are taught at a young age. Eighth grader Karina Fiskum is working on a project to add an Environmental Sustainability unit into the Middle School science curriculum. As a required course, we hope that this unit will not only educate students about the environment, but also inspire them to get involved more personally and work to make our community even better.

As you can see from all of these projects, EAB Goes Green is not simply an “eco-club” that goes around yelling at people for not recycling their plastic properly (although we may do that sometimes too). EGG is a club dedicated to changing the very values of our community and the views of our students and staff regarding one of the most pressing issues of our generation.

 

*If you’re interested in joining EGG (we’re always looking for new members!), or even just in finding out more about our club, feel free to visit our Instagram page, or contact our leadership team directly at eab202004788@eabdf.br and eab202004840@eabdf.br.

 

 

 

Highlights of the 2019 IB Art Exhibition

By: Luiza Boiteux

This past Saturday, the 13th of April, the EAB community had the honor of looking at the work of the IB visual arts students. The exhibition involved both first and second years students, and it was surprising to see the fantastic work they are already producing.

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Junior Chloe Posthuma Coelho

For the first year students, there was a myriad of themes discussed. Chlo‎é Posthuma-Coelho presented the “Natural selection series” in which she showed the painful reality of natural disasters, as she was very moved by the Mariana disaster, and the most recent case of Brumadinho. One of her paintings, called “Protector” represented a victim rising from the mud. Another one had toys covered in mud, as a way to represent the children affected by the calamity, as well as the innocence lost after dealing with the consequences of a natural disaster.

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Junior Madison Holman

Madison Holman had her artwork surrounding the relations of power in society and had within her collection a piece that caught the attention of numerous people in the exhibition: it was called “Temps”, and it consisted of 9 eggs hanging in a circle, symbolizing how the female body is coveted, as “women are wanted for their eggs”, the nine eggs representing the nine months of pregnancy. Madison also had photo montages that replaced the male figure with the word “power” and a realistic drawing.

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Junior Duda Bulhoes

Duda Bulhões was inspired by her feelings, having her pieces based on the themes of nostalgia and solitude. She successfully achieved her goal, as one of the first things that I noticed was the Sailor Moon inspired batik paintings. Another highlight was the piece “Alone,” a black box with a white figure in the corner, symbolizing the feeling of a mental breakdown.

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Junior Ana Luiza Santiago

Ana Luiza conveyed with her work a very critical view of the world, with the work centering some of the reoccurring issues in Brazil and the world. One of her pieces consisted of five of the Saudi Arabia women activists, who were imprisoned because they were fighting for their right to drive. Another of her works had a bromeliad inside an hourglass, representing how with time, the flower has been taken from nature to be used to decorate houses.  

Carolina Telino explored the language expressed through the body with photographs, paintings and a photomontage. She had the intention of portraying the personality and the background that is expressed in one’s physical structure (the lines, marks and curves), showing how important it is to give bodies a voice which “conveys a stronger message than anything else”, as she explained in the reflection.  

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Junior Sophia Umbeck

Sophia Umbeck had several different pieces that had to do with fashion and nature itself. A particular part that stood out was made of varying magazine cut-outs, forming a woman in black and white in the center, surrounded by pictures of things such as makeup, clothes, and other items one would find in high fashion magazines, adding to that, the piece also included melted lipstick. All of that added to the theme of societal pressure when it comes to feminine beauty.

Joel Krieghbaum also expressed her emotions in her artwork, which might have been one of the most colorful in the exhibition. One of her pieces, made with wax and fabric paint consisted of a person sitting a bathroom that seemed to be flooding and abstract painting that conveys the feeling of dissociation.

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Conceptual Piece by Bella Marques

As soon as I entered the exhibition, I couldn’t help but notice Isabella Marques’ sculpture, called “Heart of Gold” (pictured above), it consisted of a human heart covered in black paint, and with scars painted in gold, representing how we can draw lessons, and learn from situations of pain, that might quite literally tear our hearts apart.

The two second years students might not even be called art students anymore, as their artwork was incredibly professional, showing that they are real artists. Alana Jara paid homage to Brasilia’s architecture (both the natural and unnatural) with pieces that represented the tesourinhas, a yellow Ipê, and a series of small pieces with Brasilia’s landmarks, such as the Catedral, the Dois Candangos monument, and much many more. It contrasted with the second part of her exhibition, which showed the not so pleasant side of the city, one of the pieces consisted of two hands with dirt and a few coins in it, representing the poverty problem that is intrinsic in Brazil.   

Bryn Dettman was inspired by eastern art in her exhibition, integrating her experiences in China. Within her artworks, there was a piece with colorful frogs, an orchid made out of wires and tissue paper, and two seals which sign the artist’s name in Chinese used to represent her identity and to give her other paintings a unique element.   

After leaving the exhibition, I couldn’t help but be excited to see what comes next in these young artists’ careers. I can’t wait to see what the first year students will have next year and to see what the seniors will achieve with this tremendous talent.

2019 IB Art Exhibition Photo Gallery

 

Photos by Luiza Boiteux

TEDXYouth@EAB 2019 Highlights

TEDx at EAB

EAB’s Ideas Worth Spreading

By Sophie Kane

TED began as a conference in my hometown of Monterey, California in our local conference center. Today it’s a world renowned organization, its speakers cover more than just technology, entertainment, and design, and its ideas have spread much farther than the Monterey Conference Center. EAB is now a three-time host of TEDx, an event that supports the voices of students, teachers, and faculty. This year the event was put on by 12th graders Yasmin Abbas, Ofri Tagner, and Ryan Sayah complete with live music performance and an exploration area with activities such as folding Japanese origami cranes (折鶴, orizuru). Topics of the talks ranged from mental health to choosing a career path to freedom of speech to racial identity, with the audience consisting of both members and non-members of the EAB community. Please enjoy these pictures of the event taken by EAB Moments photographers Yuqiao Song, Joan Emmanuel, Alma Sato, and Sherlynn Chew.

 

 

 

 

Bulls Give Back to Community: NHS Trip to CIL

By Emma Holm-Olsen

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As we near the holiday season, I’ve been contemplating how I can make my community a better place, and what I can do to help the people around me. I think one of the best organizations at EAB that encapsulates those values is the National Honor Society. Indeed, NHS’s recent trip to the Interscholastic Center for Language is a great example of how we can all do a little bit more for others. As Charles M. Schulz said best, Christmas is doing a little something extra for someone.” This past Monday, a group of 6 students along with High School Biology teacher Ms. Kahle, took a trip to visit CIL, an extracurricular language school that teaches English to Brazilian students.

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          These are high school age students just like us, that are interested in the English language and American culture, and passionate about learning all they can about it. I saw this as an opportunity to share something that is important to me with others, as well as an exercise in diplomacy and international friendship. I always like to meet new people, and this just felt like something I had to do, for them and for myself. When we got there, my heart sunk a bit. The building was obviously old and somewhat falling apart, and the inside was bright and clean, but just a tad bit depressing if I’m being completely honest. I’m embarrassed to say that I immediately thought, “How lucky I am to be at such a nice school with such great teachers and academic opportunities!”. And even though the school was perfectly nice, it was definitely an eye-opening experience.

         We walked into a tiny classroom, and saw 12 students sitting at their desks. The students’ ages ranged from 16 to 21, something that I guess surprised me a bit. They were all super sweet though, and were obviously very excited to have a little something different in their day. We introduced ourselves, and asked the students to form a circle. We started by testing on-their-feet vocabulary skills in a fast-paced ice-breaker game. Then we transitioned to discussing an article we had prepared the week before at our meeting. The article was about the pros and cons of social media, something we figured they would be interested in, since you know, us teenagers are obsessed with our phones! We broke up into groups of 6, with two EAB students per group. In our groups, we read the article, and then discussed vocabulary they had trouble with, and just the topics in general to give them some extra conversational practice.

         Since we only had an hour with the students, we had to wrap it up and say our goodbyes after what seemed like only a few minutes. I had a lot of fun, and honestly hope that we continue our relationship with the school, as well as continue to work with the students. It was an invaluable experience for me, and incredibly rewarding to leave that school knowing we had taught them something, and given them something nice and new to do in a day of what might be monotonous classes. I can’t wait to see where NHS takes us next!

Behind the Scenes of “the Miracle Worker”

The Room’s a Wreck, But Her Napkin is Folded: The Incredible Amount of Patience That Went into Producing the “Miracle Worker”

By Madison Holman and Emma Holm-Olsen

Let’s face it. You probably struggle to even walk up the stairs without tripping over your own feet in the dark. But if you thought that was hard, try adding a blindfold that would completely handicap your eyes. And might as well add a pair of ear plugs in there too, while we’re at it. Now I know you’re probably thinking – I thought we were talking about the play, not role-playing being blind and deaf. Welcome to the world of method acting – a world where if it’s written you’re blind, you bet your eyes will be of no use. Or welcome to the world of the four girls that are casted as Helen Keller, a blind and deaf girl in the late 1800s of America that learned how to speak, in EAB’s production of “Miracle Worker.”

When asked what the hardest thing about the play has been so far, director Kate Riley answered: “I wanted to give as many people as possible the opportunity to play a giant leading role, so I double-cast, but then I cast 4 Helens. So we’re going to have four productions, with one Helen [Keller] for each cast … We need about 480 hours of rehearsing that we have to fit into somewhere around 120-130 hours of rehearsal.”

Sure enough she was right; this play has been incredibly time-consuming and tiring. Eleventh grader Thomas Brassanini playing Captain Keller, Helen’s father, told us that memorizing lines was especially difficult.

It was hard because Keller’s lines are pretty wordy, very long, and very specific, so to actually get it word for word was very tough.

But aside from the difficult lines written in “old-timey” language that many of the cast members have been struggling with, we also all had to learn accents for the show- southern accents for most of us- while the girls playing Annie Sullivan had to pull out an Irish accent.

So then there was learning the accents, which range from a mild Greek, to an Irish to an Alabamian southern accent. Ninth grader Abe Barlow, playing James Keller, Helen’s brother, said:

You can start by trying to learn the accent, but what’s hard is getting into the rhythm to be able to switch back and forth between your normal voice and the accent you’re trying to portray.

But even though this is a pretty difficult production to put on, co-director and former EAB student Jader Neto says he is incredibly proud of the work that has been put into this show: “Well, I’m proud because this is my first time directing anything, and I’m proud to see all of my friends who have been acting mates in the past getting this play, [which is] not an easy play by any account … The play’s coming through really nicely, and it’s really good to see all the effort everyone is putting in is coming together into this, like, piece of art, that will definitely touch people.”

The cast couldn’t agree more. We’ve all had so much fun working on this show, and we hope that the audience gets as rich an experience out of seeing it as we got working on it. The story of Helen Keller is unbelievably important, especially nowadays when people have started to forget her life’s accomplishments. I think the two of us speak for everyone when we say we feel incredibly grateful to be a part of the retelling of this amazing story.

 

Come see the “Miracle Worker” on Thursday November 8 at 7:30 pm, Friday November 9 at 4 pm and 7:30 pm, and Saturday November 10 at 3pm. We hope to see you all there and we can’t wait to share with you all of our hard work!