“The Power Of”: EAB’s Most Recent Addition to an Inspired Community

By Emma Holm-Olsen

A few weeks ago, EAB hosted the first ever Soapbox. Soapbox, inspired by the TEDxYouth events of the past, is an event that was designed to provide the chance for members of the community to give speeches about topics of importance to them, and to incite their peers to learn, grow, and make change in their world. The idea behind the name Soapbox, is the literal box that traditionally has been used as a makeshift stand for public speeches. We wanted to incorporate this idea of freedom of speech and spontaneity, as well as the understanding that all of our ideas are valid and should be respected. We also wanted to underline the fact that EAB is a safe, judgement free place for us to inspire each other and learn from one another. The theme for the event was “the Power of…” since we believe that power comes from a vast array of outlets, and that lots of small actions when multiplied can bring great change. The event highlighted the topics of growth, activism, and sustainability, however, our speakers presented on a variety of topics, ranging from artistic interpretation to our lives on social media.

The event, which happened on February 8th, was, I believe, a huge success. Although the audience was relatively small, the turnout that we received and the support and engagement of the audience members was more than we could have hoped for. We are so proud of all of the students, teachers, and parents that gathered the courage to get up on stage and speak about things they are passionate about, and we sincerely hope that everyone left the school that day had learned something, and were feeling inspired to grow personally and to help their communities grow as well. 

The leadership team is so grateful to have had the opportunity to plan and host this inaugural event, and hope that EAB will continue this tradition in coming years!

Please refer to the Gallery page of this website to see some photos from this year’s event!

 

Club Spotlight: EAB Goes Green!

By Emma Holm-Olsen

 

I’m sure you’ve all heard about EAB Goes Green (EGG) at some point or another, but do any of you actually know what EGG has been doing, and plans to do? My guess is no, or at least not entirely. In any case, as a new member of EGG, I wanted to use Bullseye’s platform to educate our community about all of the fascinating and important initiatives the club is doing. Recently, the club and some other students and staff that were interested, took a trip to Sitio Geranium, a sustainable farm dedicated to saving energy and resources, and developing new techniques and inventions to ensure future sustainability and environmental conservation.

(Photos below courtesy of EAB Goes Green)

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The farm advertises itself as an “open-air classroom with the purpose of environmental education” (Sitio Geranium). The visit was not only fun, but it was really inspiring to see how a small farm in the outskirts of Brasilia is doing so much to preserve the resources we have, as well as educating students and other visitors about how we as regular citizens can incorporate some of the same practices into our daily lives. From organic composting to green houses, the farm essentially had around 95% sustainability across the facility, an incredible feat for a institution, and a business no less, in this day and age. The club is actively trying to incorporate some of these ideas into initiatives at our school, including possibly an annual Environmental Day at EAB and even our very own composting area. Now you’re probably thinking, “Ok this is good and all, but how much of an effect are all of these things going to have on the students’ actions and opinions about the environment?” And you’re completely right. Which is why the club has also been advocating to change the very things our students are taught at a young age. Eighth grader Karina Fiskum is working on a project to add an Environmental Sustainability unit into the Middle School science curriculum. As a required course, we hope that this unit will not only educate students about the environment, but also inspire them to get involved more personally and work to make our community even better.

As you can see from all of these projects, EAB Goes Green is not simply an “eco-club” that goes around yelling at people for not recycling their plastic properly (although we may do that sometimes too). EGG is a club dedicated to changing the very values of our community and the views of our students and staff regarding one of the most pressing issues of our generation.

 

*If you’re interested in joining EGG (we’re always looking for new members!), or even just in finding out more about our club, feel free to visit our Instagram page, or contact our leadership team directly at eab202004788@eabdf.br and eab202004840@eabdf.br.

 

 

 

Highlights of the 2019 IB Art Exhibition

By: Luiza Boiteux

This past Saturday, the 13th of April, the EAB community had the honor of looking at the work of the IB visual arts students. The exhibition involved both first and second years students, and it was surprising to see the fantastic work they are already producing.

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Junior Chloe Posthuma Coelho

For the first year students, there was a myriad of themes discussed. Chlo‎é Posthuma-Coelho presented the “Natural selection series” in which she showed the painful reality of natural disasters, as she was very moved by the Mariana disaster, and the most recent case of Brumadinho. One of her paintings, called “Protector” represented a victim rising from the mud. Another one had toys covered in mud, as a way to represent the children affected by the calamity, as well as the innocence lost after dealing with the consequences of a natural disaster.

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Junior Madison Holman

Madison Holman had her artwork surrounding the relations of power in society and had within her collection a piece that caught the attention of numerous people in the exhibition: it was called “Temps”, and it consisted of 9 eggs hanging in a circle, symbolizing how the female body is coveted, as “women are wanted for their eggs”, the nine eggs representing the nine months of pregnancy. Madison also had photo montages that replaced the male figure with the word “power” and a realistic drawing.

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Junior Duda Bulhoes

Duda Bulhões was inspired by her feelings, having her pieces based on the themes of nostalgia and solitude. She successfully achieved her goal, as one of the first things that I noticed was the Sailor Moon inspired batik paintings. Another highlight was the piece “Alone,” a black box with a white figure in the corner, symbolizing the feeling of a mental breakdown.

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Junior Ana Luiza Santiago

Ana Luiza conveyed with her work a very critical view of the world, with the work centering some of the reoccurring issues in Brazil and the world. One of her pieces consisted of five of the Saudi Arabia women activists, who were imprisoned because they were fighting for their right to drive. Another of her works had a bromeliad inside an hourglass, representing how with time, the flower has been taken from nature to be used to decorate houses.  

Carolina Telino explored the language expressed through the body with photographs, paintings and a photomontage. She had the intention of portraying the personality and the background that is expressed in one’s physical structure (the lines, marks and curves), showing how important it is to give bodies a voice which “conveys a stronger message than anything else”, as she explained in the reflection.  

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Junior Sophia Umbeck

Sophia Umbeck had several different pieces that had to do with fashion and nature itself. A particular part that stood out was made of varying magazine cut-outs, forming a woman in black and white in the center, surrounded by pictures of things such as makeup, clothes, and other items one would find in high fashion magazines, adding to that, the piece also included melted lipstick. All of that added to the theme of societal pressure when it comes to feminine beauty.

Joel Krieghbaum also expressed her emotions in her artwork, which might have been one of the most colorful in the exhibition. One of her pieces, made with wax and fabric paint consisted of a person sitting a bathroom that seemed to be flooding and abstract painting that conveys the feeling of dissociation.

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Conceptual Piece by Bella Marques

As soon as I entered the exhibition, I couldn’t help but notice Isabella Marques’ sculpture, called “Heart of Gold” (pictured above), it consisted of a human heart covered in black paint, and with scars painted in gold, representing how we can draw lessons, and learn from situations of pain, that might quite literally tear our hearts apart.

The two second years students might not even be called art students anymore, as their artwork was incredibly professional, showing that they are real artists. Alana Jara paid homage to Brasilia’s architecture (both the natural and unnatural) with pieces that represented the tesourinhas, a yellow Ipê, and a series of small pieces with Brasilia’s landmarks, such as the Catedral, the Dois Candangos monument, and much many more. It contrasted with the second part of her exhibition, which showed the not so pleasant side of the city, one of the pieces consisted of two hands with dirt and a few coins in it, representing the poverty problem that is intrinsic in Brazil.   

Bryn Dettman was inspired by eastern art in her exhibition, integrating her experiences in China. Within her artworks, there was a piece with colorful frogs, an orchid made out of wires and tissue paper, and two seals which sign the artist’s name in Chinese used to represent her identity and to give her other paintings a unique element.   

After leaving the exhibition, I couldn’t help but be excited to see what comes next in these young artists’ careers. I can’t wait to see what the first year students will have next year and to see what the seniors will achieve with this tremendous talent.

2019 IB Art Exhibition Photo Gallery

 

Photos by Luiza Boiteux

TEDXYouth@EAB 2019 Highlights

TEDx at EAB

EAB’s Ideas Worth Spreading

By Sophie Kane

TED began as a conference in my hometown of Monterey, California in our local conference center. Today it’s a world renowned organization, its speakers cover more than just technology, entertainment, and design, and its ideas have spread much farther than the Monterey Conference Center. EAB is now a three-time host of TEDx, an event that supports the voices of students, teachers, and faculty. This year the event was put on by 12th graders Yasmin Abbas, Ofri Tagner, and Ryan Sayah complete with live music performance and an exploration area with activities such as folding Japanese origami cranes (折鶴, orizuru). Topics of the talks ranged from mental health to choosing a career path to freedom of speech to racial identity, with the audience consisting of both members and non-members of the EAB community. Please enjoy these pictures of the event taken by EAB Moments photographers Yuqiao Song, Joan Emmanuel, Alma Sato, and Sherlynn Chew.