How to Write A College Essay

By Felipe Bauer

I realized I don’t have an exciting enough life to use a significant event as a launching pad through which demonstrate my very vivid and exquisitely rich personality. That is why I make the conscious decision to lie, or rather, embellish the truth. After all, you have no way of confirming my story.

Because I need practice.

And you see, Mr. Admissions Officer Person, practice makes perfect. That shows a lot about my person because it demonstrates that I’m a hardworking individual. That is why I would be a good addition to this arbitrarily selected course I’ll probably drop anyway once my privileged self realizes money doesn’t grow on trees, or on analytical essays on Shakespeare.

But perhaps I am getting a bit ahead of myself. To avoid cliches, I selected this totally specific writing prompt, through which I will recall a most significant event that occurred to me, that is, the person writing this essay, in my short existence on this Earth. It was a rainy Saturday night, on the day of – a date that I very specifically remember – when working with the beggar I had helped on the streets the previous days, three kittens were saved from a burning building by the valiant efforts exerted by our persons. 

From the life-changing experience that was witnessing a building burning on a rainy day, I realized I don’t have an exciting enough life to use a significant event as a launching pad through which demonstrate my very vivid and exquisitely rich personality. That is why I make the conscious decision to lie, or rather, embellish the truth. After all, you have no way of confirming my story.

Now with that exhausting recollection out of the way, I must tell you why I have chosen, this, again, meticulously selected course. It is due to these very specific reasons that apply only to me and to no one else. Firstly, I greatly enjoy partaking in intellectual pursuits within this area of study. Secondly, I hope to one day work with such a subject matter. Thirdly, it was the least competitive option offered at your prestigious learning institution, and to me, quite frankly, name recognition is more important than human integrity. What’s the point of a challenge if you don’t win, my grandfather, a retired Vietnam war veteran used to say?

The point, or should I say, purpose, is that you grow from the experience. And with that, my hardworking person has produced an essay with structural coherence. I have high hopes that this was enough to convince you that I am, indeed, a human being, and not just a number on a screen and to prompt in you a certain curiosity for my character, which is not the one I have fabricated, enough so to let me attend your esteemed institution.

American Film Noir

By Joao T. Corbett

American Film Noir

From “The Maltese Falcon”

What is Film Noir?

In the dark and tight spaces of urban America, a new genre of film was developed. A style reflective of its historical backgrounds of the great depression and the second world war. It is a style characterized by its cynical and existentialist heroes, employing frequent use of flashbacks, and intricate plots. Dubbed “film noir” in 1946 by French-Italian critic Nino Frank, this genre evolved out of the crime dramas of the 1930s, whose romanticized prohibition-era gangsters inspired the detectives of film noir. 

Lighting

Film Noir is known for its innovative lighting which evolved out of the Weimar-era German expressionist style. The main characterization of the lightning is actually the lack of it. Darkness often disturbed only by a weak street light can create a feeling of mystery, and discomfort. This, matched with their soften depressive settings of early rainy mornings, delpitated apartments and dark streets illuminated only by the shimmering halos of street lights helps reinforce the idea of a mysterious plot, and a cynical society. 

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The use of lightning in Billy Wilder’s “Double Indemnity” helps portray the protagonist’s moral decline.

Characters and Themes

The hero of a Noir film is often a lonely man (almost always a detective) who has developed, as a consequence of their environment, a cynic attitude towards life. This leads to them having a fatalistic look on the society around them, and consequently being alienated from it. These characters developed from the many veterans arriving back home from years in the second world war, finding that the society they had left to protect had become totally unrecognizable, leading to them becoming alienated and developing these characteristics. The noir genre also makes avid use of moral ambiguity leading to viewers often sympathizing with their protagonists, and eagerly falling their detective journey through the entirety of the movie. 

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Humphrey Bogart, considered by many to be the face of Film Noir. 

Sources

https://www.britannica.com/art/film-noir

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-h1ceF9ToI&t=18s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K77aPil7btM