Highlights of the 2019 IB Art Exhibition

By: Luiza Boiteux

This past Saturday, the 13th of April, the EAB community had the honor of looking at the work of the IB visual arts students. The exhibition involved both first and second years students, and it was surprising to see the fantastic work they are already producing.

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Junior Chloe Posthuma Coelho

For the first year students, there was a myriad of themes discussed. Chlo‎é Posthuma-Coelho presented the “Natural selection series” in which she showed the painful reality of natural disasters, as she was very moved by the Mariana disaster, and the most recent case of Brumadinho. One of her paintings, called “Protector” represented a victim rising from the mud. Another one had toys covered in mud, as a way to represent the children affected by the calamity, as well as the innocence lost after dealing with the consequences of a natural disaster.

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Junior Madison Holman

Madison Holman had her artwork surrounding the relations of power in society and had within her collection a piece that caught the attention of numerous people in the exhibition: it was called “Temps”, and it consisted of 9 eggs hanging in a circle, symbolizing how the female body is coveted, as “women are wanted for their eggs”, the nine eggs representing the nine months of pregnancy. Madison also had photo montages that replaced the male figure with the word “power” and a realistic drawing.

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Junior Duda Bulhoes

Duda Bulhões was inspired by her feelings, having her pieces based on the themes of nostalgia and solitude. She successfully achieved her goal, as one of the first things that I noticed was the Sailor Moon inspired batik paintings. Another highlight was the piece “Alone,” a black box with a white figure in the corner, symbolizing the feeling of a mental breakdown.

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Junior Ana Luiza Santiago

Ana Luiza conveyed with her work a very critical view of the world, with the work centering some of the reoccurring issues in Brazil and the world. One of her pieces consisted of five of the Saudi Arabia women activists, who were imprisoned because they were fighting for their right to drive. Another of her works had a bromeliad inside an hourglass, representing how with time, the flower has been taken from nature to be used to decorate houses.  

Carolina Telino explored the language expressed through the body with photographs, paintings and a photomontage. She had the intention of portraying the personality and the background that is expressed in one’s physical structure (the lines, marks and curves), showing how important it is to give bodies a voice which “conveys a stronger message than anything else”, as she explained in the reflection.  

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Junior Sophia Umbeck

Sophia Umbeck had several different pieces that had to do with fashion and nature itself. A particular part that stood out was made of varying magazine cut-outs, forming a woman in black and white in the center, surrounded by pictures of things such as makeup, clothes, and other items one would find in high fashion magazines, adding to that, the piece also included melted lipstick. All of that added to the theme of societal pressure when it comes to feminine beauty.

Joel Krieghbaum also expressed her emotions in her artwork, which might have been one of the most colorful in the exhibition. One of her pieces, made with wax and fabric paint consisted of a person sitting a bathroom that seemed to be flooding and abstract painting that conveys the feeling of dissociation.

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Conceptual Piece by Bella Marques

As soon as I entered the exhibition, I couldn’t help but notice Isabella Marques’ sculpture, called “Heart of Gold” (pictured above), it consisted of a human heart covered in black paint, and with scars painted in gold, representing how we can draw lessons, and learn from situations of pain, that might quite literally tear our hearts apart.

The two second years students might not even be called art students anymore, as their artwork was incredibly professional, showing that they are real artists. Alana Jara paid homage to Brasilia’s architecture (both the natural and unnatural) with pieces that represented the tesourinhas, a yellow Ipê, and a series of small pieces with Brasilia’s landmarks, such as the Catedral, the Dois Candangos monument, and much many more. It contrasted with the second part of her exhibition, which showed the not so pleasant side of the city, one of the pieces consisted of two hands with dirt and a few coins in it, representing the poverty problem that is intrinsic in Brazil.   

Bryn Dettman was inspired by eastern art in her exhibition, integrating her experiences in China. Within her artworks, there was a piece with colorful frogs, an orchid made out of wires and tissue paper, and two seals which sign the artist’s name in Chinese used to represent her identity and to give her other paintings a unique element.   

After leaving the exhibition, I couldn’t help but be excited to see what comes next in these young artists’ careers. I can’t wait to see what the first year students will have next year and to see what the seniors will achieve with this tremendous talent.